journal

BEGIN JOURNAL: PROCESS, CONNECT EVERYTHING

Occasional questions, also to be explored in your journal at home:
A FEW QUESTIONS, BASED ON CLASS EXERCISES:
Reflect on what you list as dreams and what you list as needs—or if you differentiate.

Your lists of needs and wants contain a wide range of things from very material to very spiritual. Some seem like necessities, others like luxuries. Which are which?

To what extent do you think the dreams and needs and wants that you have listed are shared by people living in “the projects”?

How do you think people in the projects might critique or prioritize your lists?

Do you live in your ideal community? If so, how did you wind up there? If not, why not?
Why do you live where you do?
…Why do you live where you do? (again, deeper)
Why do the people who don‘t live there, not live there?
What is the next question…?
Who and what do you know a lot about? Little or nothing about, except second-hand?
Who and what are you making assumptions about?



ARCHITECTURE QUESTIONS:

What might the implications of this be for architecture? your chosen field of study?
For architecture students: is there a parallel for other disciplines?
Who has had drafting? Dance?
Why might a dance class be better preparation for architecture than drafting? (NOT “creativity”: what else?)
How might being blind improve you as an architect?

Reflect on the readings in your journals whether they show up in class or not.
How are you underprivileged?
again: Who’s not here?
What are you thinking?

THINKING JOURNAL, not where you put your notes….separate book that covers 1. tours, voices, classes, videos, and
2. your own thoughts (not opinions)…everything.
Small, so you can have it at all times, constant companion; write in little bits, spontaneously; not big set- aside times for “journaling.”

It’s not a perfunctory check list; you are responsible for covering everything: so we could recreate entire course from your journal; not spotty
Explore, connect, root around in contradictions. Look for complexity, not ideology. “Flip it.” Don’t use the following words:
“I think,” “I feel,” “I believe,” “I (dis)agree,” “I (don’t) like.”
VOICES and “unassigned” readings will appear more in your journals than in discussions. The voices are often opinions, but not your journal entries about them. Get rid of opinions and just look and think deeply.

Don’t just tick off answers like you’re taking a test or dismissing essay answers…or write like you’re trying to write an “A” paper.

Write without being assigned a specific task; relate new material to previous: connections will appear as semester evolves.

Write from your heart and head, but ranting is not caring; don’t worry about right answers, but don’t stop at “I don’t know.” It can be diary-like or more like literature.

Now and then we WILL assign entry topics (like: Who’s not here?). We won’t answer a lot of specific

questions; you decide, you take a risk. Don’t make this unnecessarily difficult.
Don’t try to think it out in advance; just start writing. Contradict yourself, change your mind, weigh it out. A place to work out your thinking….

David McCullough, 2010: “When we start writing we often have insights we wouldn’t have had had we not been writing. Keep writing; keep a journal, work your thoughts out on paper. So much of our education is predicated on knowing answers. Don’t let that side of the educational process let you stop asking questions. Show you have curiosity.”

A MAJOR PIECE EVIDENCE OF YOUR INVOLVEMENT IN THE COURSE
TURN IN via email EVERY WEEK (deadline: Monday mornings 8 AM)
SO YOU DON’T GET BEHIND AND CAN TRACE YOUR ACTUAL (NOT RECALLED) EVOLUTION


send to Andy at: ALWRaimist@me.com